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January 2018 Number 114


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Francesca Calegari awarded ICO Prize 2017

Since August 2016 she is Full Professor at the University of Hamburg and Leading Scientist at DESY, Hamburg, Germany.



Prof. Francesca Calegari, University of Hamburg and DESY, Germany.

 

The ICO Prize Committee, consisting of Roberta Ramponi (chair), Zohra Ben-Lakhdar, Yujie Ding, John Harvey, John Howell, Seug-Han Park, Eric Rosas, Maria J Yzuel, and Bingkun Zhou, awarded the 2017 ICO Prize to Prof. Francesca Calegari, University of Hamburg, Germany, “for her innovative and pioneering research on the generation of isolated XUV attosecond pulses at the nJ-energy level and their application to the study of the electron dynamics in complex molecules”.

Prof. Calegari received her PhD in Physics in March 2009. From Dec 2011 till Aug 2016 she had a permanent position as a researcher at IFN-CNR, Milan, Italy. From 2013 till 2016 she was professor of Physics at Politecnico di Milano in Milan, Italy. Since August 2016 she is Full Professor of Physics at the University of Hamburg and Leading Scientist at DESY, Hamburg, Germany. She is co-author of more than 50 articles on peer-reviewed journals. Her research field is attosecond science and technology.

Prof. Calegari is one of the young rising talents in attosecond science. Her main achievements are: a new approach for the generation of isolated attosecond pulses at the nJ-energy level for the realization of XUV sources with high photon flux at the kHz repetition rate; the application of this XUV technology to track the electron dynamics in large systems (e.g. sub-4 fs charge migration in amino acid phenylalanine); the demonstration of the possibility to track in real-time the scattering behavior of electrons propagating in a dielectric material after the interaction with high-energy photons. The outstanding contributions of Prof. Calegari have been clearly proven to be the first step in the direction of controlling the electron dynamics in complex molecules for a future “attochemistry”.

 

Snapshots of charge dynamics induced by XUV attosecond pulses in the amino acid Phenylalanine (F. Calegari et al., Science 346, 336 (2014)).